Akkermansia muciniphila

Akkermansia muciniphila, the only currently known species within genus Akkermansia, can reside in the human intestinal tract and is currently being studied for its effects on human metabolism. Recently performed studies in rodents have indicated that Akkermansia muciniphila in the intestinal tract may mediate obesity, diabetes, and inflammation. (source)

Akkermansia muciniphila:

Dominant mucus-layer species; may represent 3-5% of microbial community in healthy adults • Abundance associated with higher bacterial gene richness in the gut • Plays role glucose homeostasis • Abundance inversely correlated with IBD (both Crohn’s and UC) and appendicitis • Abundance inversely correlates with body weight in pregnant women and children • Some have reported decreased A. muciniphila in pre-diabetes and decreased Verrocomicrobiae abundance in T2D and pre-diabetes • Lower in autism (source)

Click HERE for a 10% off coupon on all uBiome services.

ubiome logo

Bacteroidetes

Bacteroidetes: are the most prominent gut microbes in much of the world. They are thought to help protect against obesity because they do not digest fat well. The first settlers of Europe needed to be able to better digest fat, so they would have enough energy to survive brutal, Ice Age winters. People who had fewer Bacteroidetes and more fat-digesting Firmicutes therefore became the dominant players. Now Bacteroidetes are underrepresented in the guts of Europeans and North Americans, but the phenomenon doesn’t appear to be genetic. African Americans’ proportions of are more similar to fellow North Americans’ than they are to native Africans’. Fortunately, this fact means that with dietary and lifestyle changes, we should be able to grow our Bacteroidetes back especially since most of us don’t need to store up for the next saber-toothed tiger hunt. (source Ubiome).

Click HERE for a 10% off coupon on all uBiome services.

ubiome logo

Firmicute

Firmicute helps us to digest fat that our bodies need for energy and are among the most common microbes in our gut. Although an oversupply of firmicutes has been linked to a higher risk of obesity, historically these bacteria helped early Europeans survive harsh winters with barely a wooly mammoth in sight. Now that we inhabit less challenging environments, an imbalance of too many Firmicutes in relation to another common gut microbe, Bacteroidetes, may be associated with obesity. However, having more Firmicutes than Bacteroidetes in the vagina is correlated with decreased risk of bacterial vaginosis. Some well-known Firmicutes are the pathogens behind diseases such as botulism and anthrax, but the vast majority are both completely harmless and necessary for normal digestion. Outside the microbiome, this diverse subgroup of bacteria is involved in processes ranging from fermentation of beer and wine, breakdown of milk into yogurt, and even toxic waste clean-up (called “bioremediation”) (Source Ubiome).

Click HERE for a 10% off coupon on all uBiome services.

ubiome logo