B. longum

B. longum:

• Abundance associated with higher bacterial gene richness in the gut • Abundance decreases with weight loss • Found Increased in obese subjects compared to lean/overweight

Source: https://www.gdx.net/core/interpretive-guides/GI-Effects-IG.pdf

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Lactobacillus spp.

Lactobacillus spp.:

• Abundance associated with higher bacterial gene richness in the gut • Studies have reported altered levels in IBS, with some finding higher concentrations and others finding lower concentrations • Lower levels reported to correlate with symptom severity in IBS • Increased levels seen in obese patients compared to lean controls

Source: https://www.gdx.net/core/interpretive-guides/GI-Effects-IG.pdf

“Overall, both of these microbes seem to be major players in the gut-brain axis. John Cryan, a neuroscientist at the University College of Cork in Ireland, has examined the effects of both of them on depression in animals. In a 2010 paper published in Neuroscience, he gave mice either bifidobacterium or the antidepressant Lexapro; he then subjected them to a series of stressful situations, including a test which measured how long they continued to swim in a tank of water with no way out. (They were pulled out after a short period of time, before they drowned.) The microbe and the drug were both effective at increasing the animals’ perseverance, and reducing levels of hormones linked to stress. Another experiment, this time using lactobacillus, had similar results. Cryan is launching a study with humans (using measurements other than the forced swim test to gauge subjects’ response).” (source)

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