B. vulgatus

B. vulgatus is associated with:

• Bacteroides spp. associated with lower bacterial gene richness in the gut• Lower levels of B. vulgatus have been seen in IBS patients in comparison to healthy controls • Low relative proportions of B. vulgatus, along with high concentrations of Lactobacillus spp. observed in the microbiota of obese children when compared to lean; B. vulgatus also found under-represented in microbiota of type-2 diabetics • B. vulgatus found to be present in significantly higher numbers in stools of severely autistic children when compared to controls • While increased B. vulgatus prevalence was associated with the genotype of infants at high risk of celiac disease development, another study found that B. vulgatus was more frequently detected in controls than in patients with treated celiac disease (p<0.01)

Source – https://www.gdx.net/core/interpretive-guides/GI-Effects-IG.pdf

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Clostridium clostridioforme

“High Clostridium clostridioforme which is associated with diabetes, low gut diversity, inflammatory conditions and human invasive and severe infections like bacteremia. Often it produces alcohol and other toxins, which are associated with inflammation, artery hardening, and histamine responses. Alcohol from microbial fermentation results in blockages of multiple enzyme pathways in the host including the degradation of histamine. When more histamine accumulates, subsequently, the host has more allergic reactions, congestion, rash, headaches or other manifestations of high histamine. These are all secondary to a dysbiotic and imbalanced gut.” (source)

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Akkermansia muciniphila

Akkermansia muciniphila, the only currently known species within genus Akkermansia, can reside in the human intestinal tract and is currently being studied for its effects on human metabolism. Recently performed studies in rodents have indicated that Akkermansia muciniphila in the intestinal tract may mediate obesity, diabetes, and inflammation. (source)

Akkermansia muciniphila:

Dominant mucus-layer species; may represent 3-5% of microbial community in healthy adults • Abundance associated with higher bacterial gene richness in the gut • Plays role glucose homeostasis • Abundance inversely correlated with IBD (both Crohn’s and UC) and appendicitis • Abundance inversely correlates with body weight in pregnant women and children • Some have reported decreased A. muciniphila in pre-diabetes and decreased Verrocomicrobiae abundance in T2D and pre-diabetes • Lower in autism (source)

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Roseburia

Roseburia is a genus of butyrate-producing, Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria that inhabit the human colon. Named in honor of Theodor Rosebury, they are members of the phylum firmicutes. Increased abundance of Roseburia is associated with weight loss and reduced glucose intolerance. (source)

• Abundance associated with higher bacterial gene richness in the gut • Less abundant in individuals with IBS, particularly constipation-predominant IBS • Counts lower in type 2 diabetics; trending inversely with plasma glucose • Lower in IBD and early-onset rheumatoid arthritis (as part of decreased E. rectale-C. coccoides group) (source)

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